The 1962/63 Season: When Winter Really Came To Britain

Ian

Ian began writing Twohundredpercent in May 2006. He lives in Brighton. He has also written for, amongst others, Pitch Invasion, FC Business Magazine, The Score, When Saturday Comes, Stand Against Modern Football and The Football Supporter. Ian was the first winner of the Socrates Award For Not Being Dead Yet at the 2010 NOPA awards for football bloggers.

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5 Responses

  1. John Beech says:

    Happy days – duffle coats for goal posts. Nostalgia? Bring it on!

  2. Paul says:

    My last year at grammar school. Made the school team and we never played a match after Christmas! My two local sides, Cambridge City and Cambridge United were battling for the Southern League Premier Division title. City had games in hand and beat United in a title decider, which I watched, at Milton Road in April before a record 11,574 crowd and ended up winning the title by 3 points.
    Happy days.

  3. Roy Ebsary says:

    “As you sit at home this afternoon watching the showjumping and possibly cursing under your breath, though, you may find it beneficial to pause and think about the 1962/63 season. Things could be much, much worse.”

    Yes, it could be the 1946-7 season which didn’t end until the middle of June. There were no midweek matches allowed for industrial reasons, as apparently the country was trying to pay off all the debts incurred because of WWII, when the UK borrowed from certain Allies who insisted on repayment.

  4. Pelegrin says:

    winter from hell…

  1. December 23, 2009

    [...] Zeit lesen möchten: When snow business meant no business (Sports Journalists’ Association) The 1962/63 Season: When Winter Came To Britain (Twohundredpercent Blog) Has a flamethrower ever been used to thaw out a frozen pitch? (Guardian, [...]

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