What The Reaction To Newcastle’s Relegation Tells Us About Ourselves

Ian

Ian began writing Twohundredpercent in May 2006. He lives in Brighton. He has also written for, amongst others, Pitch Invasion, FC Business Magazine, The Score, When Saturday Comes, Stand Against Modern Football and The Football Supporter. Ian was the first winner of the Socrates Award For Not Being Dead Yet at the 2010 NOPA awards for football bloggers.

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7 Responses

  1. Ian Steele says:

    Very, very good article. Well written, and some home truths in there that not all fans will like. We weren’t too good to go down, and I actually think that it is in one way the best thing for the club, as all the over-paid, but under-worked “stars” will leave.

    And….we might actually win some games in the Championship! Hurrah!

  2. chris b says:

    What a good article. As a Villa fan who was there yesterday I have to say that there was a desire to send Newcastle down, not out of spite, but because of the reasons you have highlighted here. Lets hope you get rid off the sky sports sobbers and become a football club again and not a media plaything…

  3. Maggpie says:

    A lot of sense there – but perhaps you are too easy on the media. Time and time again I read things that are supposed to be what the “average” Toon fan thinks and feels – and mostly it is a media- fuelled image and concept that represents the worst kind of lazy, brainless journalism – in any other situation it could even be deemed potentially racial stereotyping. Most of the time we pray for the bloody press to just leave us alone – did we ask to be a “media plaything”?
    I don’t know anyone who claims that we are the “best fans” – but I do know a lot of people who have supported the club for many years -with very little vicarious glory to show for it. Perhaps we are fortunate in being a one-team city – but we have had good levels of loyal support through thick and thin – some of which does seem to provoke jealousy in other teams’ fans, for some reason. As for the sobbing – I have seen images of supporters of Chelsea, West Brom and many unsuccessful play-off teams who find their sadness overwhelming. It also seems to be the norm on shows like X-factor for both successful and unsuccessful acts to become moist-eyed. And yet because a camera can find an occasional Newcastle supporter, we are apparently asking for and deserving of any disaster that befalls us?
    I could wax lyrical about the fans who are said to be annoyed that their team hasn’t won anything for 5 years, or “only” won the Carling cup, or only finished 4th etc. We have supported a team that hasn’t won a meaningful trophy since 1969 – and yet you begrudge us our small pleasures in wanting to watch our team play at the top level, play some good football and maybe give us some brief hope of something better.
    Shame on you all.

  4. Joe says:

    The media view of Newcastle supporters is absurdly twisted. I don’t recognise the stereotype that they portray.

    I wonder how many street interviews are binned until they get the one where some thick knacker gives them the copy they want? Even local TV did it today. There must have been hundreds of people passing the ground today and yet they got a particularly gormless couple on our screens at lunchtime.

    I’ve met a complete cross section of fans from a message board. One or two of them were fairly dim but the rest were blokes with trades or professionals. All of them could string a few words together, unlike the normal Setanta/Sky Sports interview fodder.

  5. Gervillian Swike says:

    Some fair points about the media image of Newcastle fans perhaps not being a fair reflection of the truth from the chaps above. It would be interesting to know whether it is commonly held throughout Newcastle fans that Shearer is the right man for the job. God knows, I haven’t seen a single person on TV daring to say, “Hang on, he won one game, got us playing really badly, and took us down. He’s got no experience, and no apparent aptitude for this kind of job. Perhaps we shouldn’t blow millions on him and a bunch of new players, only to have to do it again in six months time when he leaves us in a relegation dogfight”. The chaps on the TV seem to think that as long as the manager’s a Geordie, it’ll all be fine (because only he would understand the area and what football means to the people). I’m not saying it’s totally irrelevant, but I am saying it’s nearly totally irrelevant.

    On the Iain Dowie issue – hang on, such a bad idea, as long as basic management and business recruitment practices are followed? He’s got a good record in the Championship, why not give him a rolling contract with a brief to get Newcastle promoted, reward him with a fat bonus if he delivers, and then say, “Thanks, now we need someone to do a different type of job in the Premiership, good luck to you” and get someone else in? Why do football clubs continue to provide contractual conditions to their managers and then not take advantage of the main benefit that that affords – to pick specific people to do specific jobs and then replace them with more suitable people when the job is completed and a new one begins?

  6. Martin says:

    It’s just another example of the ludricrous over-reaction when it comes to sport these days. It’s like no-one has ever been relegated before. Just like Leeds, Newcastle are one of the thirty or so clubs that are too big to go bust. Their owners and supporters would happily even break the law (i.e. Bates’ engineering of Leeds’ debt to avoid paying HMRC) to keep the club at the higher levels of English football.

  7. LW says:

    What a good article. As a Villa fan who was there yesterday I have to say that there was a desire to send Newcastle down, not out of spite, but because of the reasons you have highlighted here. Lets hope you get rid off the sky sports sobbers and become a football club again and not a media plaything…

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